Mogo
tastefullyoffensive:

[theoatmeal] (bonus panel)

Bomba Estéreo - Pure Love

friolenta:

Gustav Klimt, Judith (I), 1901. Oil on canvas. The Vienna Secession. 

friolenta:

Gustav Klimt, Judith (I), 1901. Oil on canvas. The Vienna Secession. 

Man only likes to count his troubles; he doesn’t calculate his happiness.
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground (via quotes-shape-us)

slephoto:

thedarklordkeisha:

Calvin is the most relatable protagonist in the history of anything.

I really think Bill Waterson spied on me when I was a kid.

thefabulousmomo:

Tristan and Isolde as a theme in art

1. A. Spiess

2. Edmund Blair-Leighton

3. Hughes Merle

4. Marianne Stokes

5. John Duncan

6. John William Waterhouse

7. Sir William Russel Flint

8. Herbert James Draper

9. Rogelio Egusquiza

thefabulousmomo:

Ophelia as a subject in art:


1. Alexander Cabanel

2. John William Waterhouse

3 and 4. John Hughes

5. Dante Gabriel Rossetti

6. Pierre Auguste Cot

7. John Wood

Ophelia was the pre-raphaelite brotherhood’s favourit subject, overall. John William Waterhouse painted her in, if memory doesn’t fail me, five different paintings, for example. The tragic Shakespearean character embodied all the brotherhood admired, aside from the romanticized medieval themes. Characters such as Ophelia, tragic females, fascinated the pre-raphaelites.

Representations of Ophelia go from tragedy to the simplest of action. Waterhouse has several paintings of Ophelia gathering flowers, merely as a beautiful female with a tragic sense (that the spectator already knows), rather than the moment she drowns in the lake. Dante Gabriel Rossetti decided to represent her in the moment Hamlet declares to love her only to refuse her the next. And Arthur Hughs captures the instant she is about to drown. Pierre August Cot, although not a pre-raphaelite, gives a creepy-like sense to the reading Ophelia, here depicting not her tragedy, but her madness.

An interesting account regarding John Everett Millais by his son refers as to how the tragically drowning Ophelia from his famous painting was embodied by his favourite female model, Elizabeth Siddal:

“Miss Siddal had a trying experience whilst acting as a model for Ophelia. In order that the artist might get the proper set of the garments in water and the right atmosphere and aqueous effects, she had to lie in a large bath filled with water, which was kept at an even temperature by lamps placed beneath. One day, just as the picture was nearly finished, the lamps went out unnoticed by the artist, who was so intensely absorbed in his work that he thought of nothing else, and the poor lady was kept floating in the cold water till she was quite benumbed. She herself never complained of this, but the result was that she contracted a severe cold, and her father wrote to Millais, threatening with an action of 50 lbs. for his carelessness. Eventually the matter was satisfactorily compromised. Millais paid the doctor’s bill, and Miss Siddal, quickly recovering, was none the worse for her cold bath.”

thecrankyprofessor:

medievalistsnet:

Images of the Medieval Apocalypse

Back into the Hellmouth that is American Security Theater.

thecrankyprofessor:

medievalistsnet:

Images of the Medieval Apocalypse

Back into the Hellmouth that is American Security Theater.

tastefullyoffensive:

[coooter]

eerinaceous:

art history meme • [2/5] movements/centuries 

art nouveau